Properly cleaning and disinfecting fitness equipment

Properly cleaning and disinfecting fitness equipment seems to be the same advice everywhere I look.

I get it.You want your equipment to stay in top shape and not only look good but smell good.

One of my friends and customers manages a slew of Planet Fitness health Clubs and we got to talking one day about what a hassle it was to maintain the equipment.The sweat and the salt in it is always attacking the surface of the equipment and cleaning alone is not effective to maintain appearance.

Most fitness facilities don't have the staff required to clean each piece of equipment after every use. Instead, they rely on users to wipe down their machines when finished by offering either spray cleaners or wipes. What type of cleaning product a facility offers matters less than how it's used; both spray cleaners and wipes can only be effective if used correctly, and damaging to equipment and end-users if not. The key is to have a good understanding of each product's capabilities.


One of my friends and customers manages a slew of Planet Fitness health Clubs and we got to talking one day about what a hassle it was to maintain the equipment.The sweat and the salt in it is always attacking the surface of the equipment and cleaning alone is not effective to maintain appearance.

Properly cleaning and disinfecting fitness equipment is more than just cleaning.

The reality is the painted surfaces should be sealed and that is when my friend began to do just that.

He says his equipment in all his clubs look brand new after two years by simply applying a coating of an sio2 sealer. A simple wipe and buff and the paint on the machines remains like new and cleaning is easier.An antibacterial cleaner is one that is capable of disinfecting; that is, it kills most of the germs and viruses commonly found in health clubs. There are various chemicals used as disinfectants, from environmentally friendly options containing chemical agents derived from citrus oils to older alcohol- or phenol-based cleaners. The problem with the latter two, however, is that they pose a threat to equipment.


A new approach

Properly cleaning and disinfecting fitness equipment can be environmentally friendly and can also protect the appearance of the exercise equipment.


Since the nineteen seventy's, it has been known, that nano particles of titanium dioxide will constantly produce hydrogen peroxide in the presence of interior or exterior UV light.

To date, this technology has not been economically commercialized for building materials applications for several reasons.  First, up and until a few years ago, the producers of TiO2 were only able to make Micron and Macro size particles. It is only recently that very small or Nano size particles have been available. Key here is that each particle regardless of size can only create so much activity or catalytic effect, therefore if you could have 20 particles in the same area where you once had just one large particle you will now have 20 times more activity. Second, if you want this process to work at the interface and on the surface of the Surface Treatment/Coating, you needed to suspend these particles in an Inorganic Clear Coating that would not be destroyed by the process that will be destroying the Organic Matter. Third, you had to figure out how to make a coating that would bond to the substrate and allow Water/Water Vapor and Oxygen to come in contact with the TiO2.

It all started on cars and boats.

So I tell my buddy if this stuff works on cars and boats,why not exercise equipment?

I have been applying it to yachts and automobiles for ten years with great results.

The same coating is being applied at car dealerships worldwide

So he does the testing and the results speak for themselves.

The equipment repels sweat and looks awesome after a two year test.

The equipment will also stay cleaner longer and it will constantly, non stop,as long as UV light is available,make hydrogen peroxide.


A clean house is a healthier house